August 1, 2014

Miniature Portraits by Melanie Bilenker






Miniature Portraits by Melanie Bilenker

Delicate pendants and brooches depicting ordinary moments of everyday life—bathing, making lunch, washing dishes—with drawings made from resin, gold, silver, and the artist’s own hair.
The Victorians kept lockets of hair and miniature portraits painted with ground hair and pigment to secure the memory of a lost love. In much the same way, I secure my memories through photographic images rendered in lines of my own hair, the physical remnants. I do not reproduce events, but quiet minutes, the mundane, the domestic, the ordinary moments.

July 31, 2014

Glass Art by Jeremy Lepisto








Glass Art by Jeremy Lepisto

Artworks using photographs of structures and urban scenes applied to the glass surface through an elaborate process.
I make artwork inspired by the layered facades of buildings, the thick tangle of city power lines, the apparent effects of time on the built environment and the other constructed elements commonly found in my everyday city surroundings. 
I employ the visual vocabulary of urban places to explore the complex in the common and comment on the condition of the spaces we all share.

Controllers: Photos by Javier Laspiur











Controllers: Photos by Javier Laspiur

Photo series showing the evolution of the handheld controller starting when the photographer first played video game consoles in 1983.

July 30, 2014

Segmentation: Glass Sculptures by Jiyong Lee









Segmentation: Glass Sculptures by Jiyong Lee

Colorful geometric glass sculptures inspired by his fascination with cell division. The simplicity and intricacy of Lee’s compositions represent the contradictory relationship between clarity and complexity found within life. As the viewer moves around his objects, the play of light transforms the sculpture into startling new forms.
The segmentation series is inspired by my fascination with science of cell, its division and the journey of growth that starts from a single cell and goes through a million divisions to become a life. I work with glass that has transparency and translucency, two qualities that serve as perfect metaphors for what is known and unknown about life science. The segmented, geometrical forms of my work represent cells, embryos, biological and molecular structures—each symbolizing the building blocks of life as well as the starting point of life. The uniquely refined translucent glass surfaces suggest the mysterious qualities of cells and, on a larger scale, the cloudiness of their futures. The Segmentation series is subtle and quiet yet structurally complex. I transforms solid glass using cutting, lamination, carving, and surface refining processes to make art that is both beautiful and deeply invested with meaning.

Paintings by Nick Fedaeff








Paintings by Nick Fedaeff

Surrealistic paintings of women with unusual hairstyles or coverings.
Inspiration can come from many sources—dreams, observing life, other painters or the esoteric creative seed randomly appearing at will. All these rich sources of influence provide Nick Fedaeff with elements that he valiantly translates to canvas. The slightly disorienting, the hallucinatory quality of a dream, the element of surprise, the absurdity of life are cleverly layered into Nick’s work referencing Surrealism and the Old Masters of the Renaissance. 

July 29, 2014

Memento Mori: Automaton Jewelry by Kim Nogueira






Memento Mori: Automaton Jewelry by Kim Nogueira

Narrative jewelry pieces made of metal that employs traditional goldsmith fabrication techniques with the movement and interaction of automata machines.
I made this automaton pendant duo with many thoughts swirling in my head—the angel and skeleton musicians are both a celebration and a warning. Together they have one name, Memento mori: the earth is my body, my head is in the clouds, and I have named them individually as well. 
We are a young destructive species living on an old extraordinary planet. We are born knowing that we will die. We are free to make our beautiful music, but it is the music of the natural world that makes this possible. As our actions as humans cause damage to ecosystems all over the globe, our chances of continuing to make beautiful music diminish. We are a part of the natural world, connected to it in ways that we are only just beginning to understand scientifically. I have a great deal of hope that more and more people are understanding this intuitively.
You can see more of her work here.

Sea Fever: Photos by David Baker










Sea Fever: Photos by David Baker

A series of painterly seascapes using long-exposure to create just enough blur on the crest of the waves while retaining details in the water, sky, and some rock formations on the shore.
At heart I’m a coastal photographer drawn to the flow of the sea and the ever changing possibilities of shore, sea and sky. Coastal landscapes may often offer a simple geography of a beach, the sea and a cloudscape and as such there is a challenge to construct new and inventive interpretations. Sea Fever is my interpretation of those seascapes and of the close affinity between sea and sky.
You can see more images at his website or purchase the book here.

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