August 22, 2014

Paintings by Dan May










Paintings by Dan May

Surreal and mysterious paintings filled with gentle creatures interacting with humans and other wild life around them. The works remind me of the illustrations of Maurice Sendak for his children's picture book Where the Wild Things Are. Dan's detail-intensive and imagination-driven works have become widely recognized for their ability to transcend the natural states of space and time.

August 21, 2014

The Blue Room: Paintings by Anwen Keeling









The Blue Room: Paintings by Anwen Keeling
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Paintings focusing on the sensuality of the female form as defined by the diffused light coming through the window.
The Blue Room paintings continue the narrative of intensely personal space. The figure is vulnerable and again entirely feminine, yet the viewer is disallowed entry to the inner monologue. Rather, the paintings blur and switch between narrative and composition. The figure, while central to the space does not dominate, rather, it is the interruption of light’s flow that forms the central narrative and ultimately invests the curve of the figure as landscape.

August 20, 2014

Mixed Media by Nick Gentry










Mixed Media by Nick Gentry

New paintings on floppy disks which are considered obsolete media and no longer in use as well as portraits created out of vintage film negatives, x-rays, and microfilm. The result is an archaeological display of digital history that pays tribute to the roles they played in modern technology and how people came to depend on them to hold every detail of their life.

Observing the Observer: Paintings by Deenesh Ghyczy





Observing the Observer: Paintings by Deenesh Ghyczy

Paintings of figures looking at fragmented images of art. In this case, the figure is stationary while the artwork is the one doing the observing from multiple angles in sort of a reverse role.

August 19, 2014

Tulip Fields: Photos by Simone Sbaraglia









Tulip Fields: Photos by Simone Sbaraglia
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Beautiful aerial shots of tulip fields captured near Amsterdam, The Netherlands that resemble the abstract works of painters like Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman and other artists associated with the Color Field movement of the late 1950s and early 1960s.
I am especially drawn to the geometry and colours, so I loved the harmony of the tulip fields from an aerial view. Having rented a small aeroplane, I explored the area from above, taking several hundred photographs in total. I was happy with the results, as, to me, the pictures seemed like the abstract paintings, and that was what I was looking for.
Simone took hundreds of images of the fields over a four day span in April 2014.

Paintings by Nathan Spoor








Paintings by Nathan Spoor

Fantastical and dreamlike paintings filled with detail and color that suggests some sort of narrative. The “suggestivism” style was something he started in graduate school and he describes it as "an intuitive process of allowing ideas to pool and then connecting with the more innovative or strong moments and nurturing them into reality."
In the larger sense, the work as a series is opening up a narrative about a world being created and explored by a young boy and girl. I see the girl creating the world around her as she sleeps, dreams, thinks and grows. The boy is more or less discovering the land and engaging its mystery. I am starting to see it as more than a simple boy meets girl story, which is how I’d begun to see it the first few years. Well, either I’m going to over-explain what I can’t really explain, or we just admit that my mind travels to some other amazing place at night and these are images that I attempt to faithfully capture from those times.

August 18, 2014

Little Planet: Time-lapse by Dubai360



Little Planet: Time-lapse by Dubai360

A time-lapse video of Dubai International Airport in the space of 24 hours with every frame warped into a "Little Planet" projection.
If you watch carefully, you will notice that the Little Planet actually makes exactly one rotation over the 24 hours of real time. Terminal 3 at the airport acts as an hour hand on a 24 hour clock, with midnight at the top, and midday at the bottom, so you can tell exactly what time every single frame was taken!

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