October 24, 2014

Dark City: Photos by Francesco Romoli












Dark City: Photos by Francesco Romoli

A series of photos that are both mysterious and unsettling at the same time. Scenes that speak of isolation and degradation that forces the viewer to access the dark recesses of the mind and formulate their own conclusions. The dioramas are constructed using wooden models which are then photographed and finished in the studio using analogue and digital techniques.
The Dark City project is based on two series, "Possible Worlds" and "Reality show”, each achieved using very different techniques: an analogue technique, using a Polaroid, and a digital technique, using image manipulation. These techniques are often seen as being at odds with one other, with the one being viewed as more objective - a mirror of reality, and the other as being more ambiguous and ephemeral; however this work reveals them to be two sides of the same coin. Wooden models are made real through a heavy-handed manipulation and, at the same time, they are laid bare by a snapshot. I like to address the issue of reality, questioning our own senses, working on the boundary between the real and the unreal, that dream-like area where nothing is as it seems, where certainties vanish and definitions change their meaning. 
I believe that one of an artist’s tasks is to drive our convictions and beliefs to the extreme, to put them "under stress" and to see if they can withstand this collision. If they do, it means that they have sound foundations, but if they don’t, they probably need to be reviewed and redefined. In this work, "material" aspects relating to the physical construction of the city coexist alongside traditional studio photographic techniques and digital manipulation techniques. Consequently, both series show us a different point of view, but with a common denominator. Dark City is disturbing, just as disturbing as losing touch with reality, when differences emerge quickly, points of reference collapse in on themselves, and the certainty of doubt is all that remains.
You can see more of Francesco's work here.

UFO Soap Pump: Design by Duncan Shotton




UFO Soap Pump: Design by Duncan Shotton
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A fun soap dispenser in the shape of a UFO with tractor beam by British designer Duncan Shotton. The soap pump comes in two colors, yellow or blue, with either a human or cow caught in mid-abduction.
My mission is to create products that engage users emotionally, promote happiness and ensure people love what they’re doing, wherever they are and whoever they're there with.

October 23, 2014

Luminous Heights: Paintings by Alexandra Pacula








Luminous Heights: Paintings by Alexandra Pacula

Paintings of glowing nighttime vistas based on photographs taken from the top of buildings in New York City.
My work investigates a world of visual intoxication; it captures moments of enchantment, which are associated with urban nightlife. I am fascinated by the ambiance of the city at night and its seductive qualities. The breathtaking turbulence of speeding vehicles and hasty pedestrians evoke feelings of wonder and disorientation. The vibrant lights become a magical landscape with enticing opportunities and promises of fulfillment.
On view at Gallery Henoch Oct 2 – 25.

Paintings by Gregory Block






Paintings by Gregory Block

Paintings portraying cabinets of curiosity consisting of skulls, moldy books, and shattered glass that alludes to decay or the fear of death. The macabre innuendo incorporated into the arrangement of objects is inspired by the symbolic tradition of vanitas painting championed by Dutch and Flemish masters such as Rembrandt and Clara Peeters.

October 22, 2014

Paintings by Adam Daily









Paintings by Adam Daily

Abstract paintings exploring color, geometry, and space using acrylic paint applied on a sheet of white PVC plastic to create vivid colors. The artworks really catch your eye when viewed from a distance.
Building on my interest in the interaction between paintings and the spaces they inhabit, my recent works are geometric explorations of color, shape, and space. These paintings are two-dimensional surfaces with the sculptural power to push and pull their environment. Chromatic intensity, distorted isometric perspective and high contrast are all key to their visual punch. Complicated, multi-layer drawings are the starting points for these paintings. Each finished piece relies on a preparatory drawing composed of hundreds of individual shapes. The drafting and editing process allows for variation and play. By manipulating shapes and colors, I create dynamic compositional interactions. The finished paintings are created on a sheet of white PVC plastic. This synthetic, smooth, bright white ground allows for a physically flat painted surface yielding intensely vivid colors. Through a methodical process I am able to build an image that deepens in complexity as I work. Since each individual geometric form is intrinsically linked to the whole, it is not until the last color is laid-in that previously disparate shapes coalesce into a finished whole. Once flat areas of color snap into place, forming illusory, dimensional space.

Damn right! Norwegian wood?: Drawings by Humberto Junca









Damn right! Norwegian wood?: Drawings by Humberto Junca
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Drawings on school desks combining Norwegian black metal logos with violent events in Colombia.

October 21, 2014

I've Fallen, and I Can't Get Up!: Animation by Dave Fothergill



I've Fallen, and I Can't Get Up!: Animation by Dave Fothergill

Hilarious animation short featuring a crowd of people running into and tripping over a metallic spinning object. The crowd dynamics animation was created using Maya, a 3D modeling, simulation, rendering, and compositing software.

Self-ish: Paintings by Luke Chueh








Self-ish: Paintings by Luke Chueh

Paintings of animal characters in ill-fated situations that balances light and dark themes and walks the fine line between comedy and tragedy.
My work is an illustrative exploration of visual and narrative contrasts. Drawing inspiration from comics and cartoons, my “cute/innocent” characters are juxtaposed into a world filled with addiction, illness, misery, and loss. 
On view at Corey Helford Gallery Oct. 11 – Nov. 1.

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